SUE WESTWIND

Mental wellness, Earth-spiritual practice,  Ecosexuality, Poetry.

Sue Westwind writes from America’s prairie woodlands.

When author Sue Westwind marries at midlife and moves to sixty acres of prairie woodland, she imagines that her life will now be fulfilled in ways she has always longed for. Yet the man she marries soon chafes at the demands of their rural life and tragically loses the passion for her that once had assured her their union would always be idyllic. As her husband grows silent and distant both from her and the land they live on, she finds erotic fulfillment in the swells and folds of the earth itself, in trees and creeks, in deer and stones. She awakens to the land erotic, and in her ever-expanding and intimate connection to it, she discovers a kind of earth-based sexuality that rejuvenates her and gives her strength to endure.

With this stunning new cycle of poems about death and survival, Sue Westwind immediately becomes one of the most important voices writing today from American’s heartland prairies. Her towering lyrical power, her ability to tell even the most heartbreaking stories in ways that make you feel like you were personally witness to them, and an authorial honesty—a willingness to look at herself, her family, and bottomless grief itself without flinching—will take your breath away. These are poems that will make you ache and deeply rejoice in the same instance. Take a deep breath, then dive in.

Sue Westwind's Most Recent Posts

THE LETTER ABOUT FEAR

Dear fellow monk in the woods, The subject line of this email reads, simply, or deceptively: “A thought.” In truth I can’t decide if it’s a thought or a vision begging to have words. I

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SEERS AND SAYERS – AND A SURPRISE

Please understand that the topics I’m about to discuss raise great skepticism in me. If the subjects of reincarnation, ancestral healing, and bloodline-transmission of trauma responses sound like mumbo jumbo or in any way bother

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SENSUAL SPRING SPIRIT SPRING

All winter I wanted to write an ecosexual response to the season of cold and dark. But a long winter’s hardly the kind of event that gets our juices flowing, we stay indoors on long

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PULL THE KNIVES FROM YOUR OWN BACK

Recently on Facebook I shared the excitement of trying to write my first blurb (an endorsement for another author’s book that is cited on its cover). The effort invoked for me the trouble I’d had

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DEAR MOUNTAIN LION: PLEASE HELP ME

What I know about you I’ve heard on this thing we call Facebook. We are the people in houses at the edge of your habitat, where we type onto screens our scuttlebutt about the neighborhood.

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